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RISEING-MOTOR-CLASSICS

Ford Vintage

 

AND MANY OTHER VINTAGE CLASSIC MAKES OF MODELS:


1932 

  The Model B was a Ford automobile produced between 1932 and 1934. It was a much updated version of the Model A and was replaced by the Model 48. Strictly speaking, the Model B was a four-cylinder car with an improved Model A engine with a displacement of 201 cu in (3.3 l) and 50 hp, but Ford also began producing a very similar car with Ford's new flathead V‑8 engine. The V‑8 car was marketed as the Model 18, though it is commonly called the Ford V‑8, and, other than the engine, is virtually indistinguishable from the Model B. 






1933

 The 1933 revision of the car was substantial, especially considering how important the 1932 change had been. For its second year, the Ford's wheelbase was stretched from 106 in (2692 mm) to 112 in (2845 mm) on a new crossmember frame. The grille was revised, gaining a pointed forward slope at the bottom which resembled either a shovel or the 1932 Packard. Both the grille and hood louvers curved down and forward. The overall design and grille were inspired by the English Ford Model Y. 







1934

  The 1934 Ford (called the Model 40A) was not as substantial a model year change as the previous two years had been. Noticeable changes included a flatter grille with a wider surround and straight hood louvers. V‑8 output was again increased, this time to 85 hp (63 kW), and the four-cylinder Model B engine was in its last year, as was the Victoria body style; nevertheless, there were fourteen body options, the Tudor being top-seller. 






1937
 The Ford line of cars was updated in 1937 with one major change  the introduction of an entry-level 136 CID (2.2 L) V8 in addition to the popular 221 CID (3.6 L) flathead V8. The model was a refresh of its predecessor, the Model 48 (itself based on the Model 40A), and was the company's main product. It was redesigned more thoroughly in 1941. 





1938 

  The 1938 recession hurt sales, as did Ford's continuing of the 1937 cars, including most body panels. 1938 DeLuxe models were differentiated with a heart-shaped grille, though standard models retained the 1937 look. The fading Slantback sedan design was cancelled for good. Only a V8 was offered, either a 60 hp V8 or a 85 hp V8. A new dash was used, with recessed controls for safety.

The 1938 trucks were finally updated, having continued with 1935 looks. Changes included a vertical oval grille and substantial fenders and bumpers. 






1939

  The Ford's look was again modernized for 1939  the De Luxe used a low pointed grille with heavier vertical slats, while the standard Ford had a higher grille with horizontal dividers. The headlights the example illustrated has been converted to '40 Ford sealed beam headlamps  '39s used bulb and reflector lamps, the last year for these were moved farther apart, now sitting almost in front of the wheels. The side grilles and louvers were removed in favor of chrome strips on De Luxe models. The "alligator" hood opened deep from the top of the grille back, eliminating the side panels found on previous models. 






1940 

  A high flat-topped hood dominated the front look of the 1940 model, as the grille spread out to reach the fenders to differentiate the De Luxe line and the headlights were pushed wider still. The standard Ford inherited the grille of the 1939 model with blackout on each side of a heavy chrome center; heavier headlight surrounds serve as another major differentiator from the 1939. 1940 was the last year of the 1937 design and its smaller V8 engine, with a straight-6 to be reintroduced the following year. Sealed-beam headlights were one of the few major advances for 1940, though a hydraulic top was new on the convertible 





1941
 

  Fords for 1941 were much more modern with a wide body that nearly covered the running boards. The front and rear fenders were still pronounced, but were now integrated more into the body and the headlights were pushed all the way up and out over the front wheels. The 1941 grille was a three-part affair with a tall center section bookended by twin kidneys low on the fenders and vertical bars all around. The 1941 was a bigger car with a 194.3 in (4935 mm) overall length. Body styles included two-door and four-door sedans, a sedan coupe, a business coupe and convertible coupe, sedan delivery wagon, and woody station wagon. The pickup truck continued with the 1940 standard Ford styling. 







1942

 

  It is certain that 1942-style Ford cars continued to be produced as military staff cars from March 1942 through summer 1945. These would have been registered as 1942, 1943, 1944, and 1945 models. Additionally, a large number of 1942 (and a few 1941) cars held in dealer stocks by government edict, to be doled out to essential users during the conflict, were Fords. Some states titled cars by the year of sale, so it is possible to find 1943, 1944, and 1945 models by virtue of their registrations and titles. 






1946





  Civilian production resumed in July 1945, with an early start to the 1946 model year filling the public's thirst for new cars. The 1946 Ford was identical to the 1942 model under the skin, though a heavy new grille with horizontal bars and red accents modernized the car somewhat. The hood was widened by adding a center strip.

One notable change was to use the 239 CID engine which since 1939 had been used in Mercury and Trucks, and capable of 100 hp (75 kW)for the first time. With steel in short supply, Ford produced a distinctive "Sportsman" convertible with wood side panels. The convertible had an electric top instead of manual one.

In the film Back to the Future, Biff Tannen's car in 1955 was a black 1946 Ford Super De Luxe convertible. After the film, the car was kept by Universal and displayed in their back lot tour. Universal sold the car in 1996 to a private collector.The vehicle is now in a private collection in south eastern Wisconsin. 






1947



 

  The 1947 Ford line was similar to the short 1946. Visual differences included the removal of the red accents from the grill and the two small lights located just above it. Ford began titling 1947s in February 1947. For the first few weeks, the 1947 model was identical to the 1946. Ford then restyled the body slightly first by moving the parking lights from above the grill to below each headlight. Exterior moldings were changed from grooved to a smooth design. A new hood ornament with a blue plastic insert was installed. New hubcap design became available in March. Interior dash color was changed from red accent to gold. By September the roof mounted antenna was moved to the cowl. Horns were moved to in front of the radiator from the engine compartment. The final 1947 models were titled in November. 






1948 - 1949

 

  1948 was the final year for the old-style Ford, with an all-new model launched partway through the year. The wood-sided Sportsman convertible would end this year with just 28 built, and the all-wood bodies on the woody station wagons would be replaced with steel for the 1949 season. The old car-based trucks were replaced by the F-Series this year. 






1949



  The 1949 models debuted at a gala at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City in June 1948, with a carousel of the new Fords complemented by a revolving demonstration of the new chassis. The new integrated steel structure was advertised as a "lifeguard body", and even the woody wagon was steel at heart. The convertible frame had an "X member" for structural rigidity.

From a customer's perspective, the old Custom, De Luxe, and Super De Luxe lines were replaced by new Standard and Custom trims and the cars gained a modern look with completely integrated rear fenders and just a hint of a fender in front. The new styling approach was also evident in the 1949 Mercury Eight and the all-new Lincoln Cosmopolitan.








1950



  1950 saw a new Crestliner "sports sedan" a 2-door sedan with 2-tone paint intended to battle Chevrolet's popular hardtop sedans of 1950. Another new name was Country Squire, which referred to the 2-door wood-sided station wagon. All wagons received flat-folding middle seats at mid-year, an innovation that would reappear in the minivans of the 1990s.

The 1949 and 1950 styling was similar, with a single central "bullet" in the frowning chrome grille. In the center there was a red space that had either a 6 or 8 depending if the car had the six-cylinder engine or the V8. The trim lines were renamed as well, with "Standard" becoming "Deluxe" and "Custom" renamed "Custom Deluxe".  





1953

  The 1951 Fords featured an optional Ford-O-Matic automatic transmission for the first time. Ford finally answered the Chevrolet Bel Air charge with the Victoria hardtop sedan in 1951. The car was an instant hit, outselling the Chevy by nearly 10%. The Crestliner continued for one more year, however. All 1951 Fords sported a new "dual-bullet" grille and heavy chrome bumpers. This year Ford also added a new "turn-key" ignition.Front suspension is independent coil springs.Head room was 36.1 inches 










          
 

 
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oldtimer
 
 
http://www.vectorforall.com/2009/vintage-cars-free-clipart/
 

http://www.fiftiesweb.com/cars/50.index.htm
 
 







 

 









 
 

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